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Children’s Health Initiative – Mission

To advance children’s mental health policy through the identification of evidence-based strategies for improving health care access, engagement, and outcomes among vulnerable populations at-risk for disparities.

Children’s Health Initiative – Who We Are

Launched in 2002, the Children’s Health Initiative (CHI) is an internationally-recognized children’s health policy research group located within the Academic Research Programs of the Cambridge Health Alliance (CHA). It brings together a team of clinicians and researchers dedicated to improving outcomes for children with mental health needs. The CHI team regularly collaborates with other research teams within CHA, as well as across the country in activities related to analyzing practice approaches and delivery system design elements intended to enhance clinical quality and cost-effectiveness.

The Children’s Health Initiative’s founder and director, Dr. Katherine E. Grimes, is a child psychiatrist and children’s health services researcher, who participates actively in training programs within Harvard Medical School, the Harvard teaching hospitals, Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and the Tufts School of Public Health, to develop workforce capacity, and develop innovative research into social policy outcomes and ways to improve population health.

 

Meet the team here!


What’s New

SAMHSA LogoSeptember 30, 2016. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has awarded CHI and the Cambridge Public Health Commission a 4-year, $4 million grant for the “Enhancing Systems of Care: Supporting Families and Improving Youth Outcomes ‘E-SOC'” project, led by Dr. Grimes and Dr. Greg Hagan, Chief of Pediatrics at Cambridge Health Alliance. Dr. Ben Cook is the Senior Scientist on the grant. E-SOC is intended to launch integrated services for CHA’s primary care population of 25,000 children, with a special focus on child trauma and early recognition and treatment.

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